Contrary

Alamo

The most popular tourist destination in Texas is the Alamo in San Antonio. No other symbol of Texas is more recognizable. It was built by the Spanish as a mission to the native Americans and was named most probably after a grove of nearby cottonwood trees, know in Spanish as álamo.

In 1836 there were about 4,000 Mexicans living in what is now known as Texas, mostly in the extreme southern section. Mexican settlers were deterred from more settlement by marauding Comanches, Apaches, and Kiowas. In addition there were about 20,000 American settlers in the southeastern section. They were all subject to the government of Mexico.

Events that led to the American colonies declaring independence from England also occurred similarly in Texas. One of the events was the Battle of the Alamo. Sources differ as to the true number but there were most likely about 200 Texans against about 1500 Mexican soldiers.

Almost all of the Texans were killed in the battle and revenge would have to wait until the Battle at San Jacinto where the Texans captured the hated Santa Anna and won their independence from Mexico.

What’s not generally known outside Texas is that those who died defending the Alamo included a few Mexicans and, yikes, even a few Yankees. Go here for a list of those who died.

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January 31, 2010 - Posted by | Uncategorized

1 Comment »

  1. My favorite Texican patriot was the Yellow Rose, at San Jac. Only in Texas would they make her the subject of the State song and sing it for two hundred years. As a former resident of New Mexico, I am very unusual in that I like Texans and admire some of the culture there.

    Comment by reddog | February 5, 2010 | Reply


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