Contrary

Panem et circenses

This phrase originates from Rome in Satire X of the Roman poet Juvenal (circa 100 AD ). In context, the Latin phrase panis et circenses (bread and circuses) is given as the only remaining cares of a Roman populace which has given up its birthright of political involvement. Here Juvenal displays his contempt for the declining heroism of his contemporary Romans. Roman politicians devised a plan in 140 B.C. to win the votes of the poor; by giving out cheap food and entertainment, politicians decided that this policy of “bread and circuses” would be the most effective way to rise to power.

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March 30, 2010 - Posted by | Uncategorized

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