Contrary

Spain

Manolo Marbán, 59, is still living in his house in Toledo and going to work in the small pink-and-aqua pet grooming shop he bought here in 2006, when he got swept up in Spain’s giddy real estate boom.

But Mr. Marbán does not own either anymore. The bank foreclosed on both properties last April, and he is waiting for the courts to issue the eviction notices. For many Americans facing foreclosure, that would be the end of it. But for Mr. Marbán and thousands of others here, it is just the beginning of their troubles. When the gavel falls on his case, he will still owe the bank more than $140,000. “I will be working for the bank for the rest of my life,” Mr. Marbán said recently, tears welling in his eyes. “I will never own anything — not even a car.”

The real estate and banking excesses in Spain were a lot like those in the United States. Construction boomed, prices rose at an astonishing pace and banks gave out loans just as fast, often to customers like Mr. Marbán, who used the equity in his house to finance a mortgage for his shop. But those days are over. Spain now has the highest unemployment rate in the euro zone — 20 percent — and real estate prices are dropping. For many Spaniards, no longer able to pay their mortgages, the fine print in the deals they agreed to years ago is catching up with them.

Not only are Spanish mortgage holders personally liable for the full amount of the loan, but throw in penalty interest charges and tens of thousands of dollars in court fees, and people can end up, like Mr. Marbán, facing a mountain of debt. Bankruptcy is not the answer, either. Mortgage debt is specifically excluded here.

Full story here

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October 31, 2010 - Posted by | Uncategorized

2 Comments »

  1. Maybe he can come here as an illegal immigrant and forget about his debts. It might even be better for him to go to Brazil or Chile. Might not be a bad idea for us to go there either.

    I know a little Spanish, I bet you do to. Portugee isn’t supposed to be too much different. Never too old to learn, eh?

    Comment by Dave | October 31, 2010 | Reply

  2. Muy, muy pocito, agui. And I am too old to learn much of anything anymore. Plus I don’t really give a shit about it. I’m sort of looking forward to what’s on the other side, if anything.

    Comment by cutshoot | October 31, 2010 | Reply


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